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Junior Chats with Alesha Dixon about the Launch of her New Kidswear Collection

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

Lee X H&M Collaboration creates sustainable denim for kids

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

Junior’s Top Picks from the Bobo Choses S/S21 Collection

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

VEJA X Mini Rodini Kid’s Trainer Collaboration

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

Marks and Spencer to Launch Roald Dahl Kids Fashion Collection

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

A new Polarn O. Pyret and Disney Collection launches – and it’s the cutest!

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The average human brain and body will do better with six months of leave. However, is your human brain and body being paid for that time away? And, even if so, is your employer (and are your colleagues) supportive of six months in a culture that, by law, has normalized 12 unpaid weeks as “enough?” These are big questions to consider, and I’d be irresponsible to share the basic research without also telling you to think about how these other bias-driven factors may make things hard all the same.

So, if the financial piece of the puzzle is okay for you, but you’re in a workplace where the thought of six months makes people do a weird thing with their face when you say it, I encourage you to do three things:

1) Read up and internalize all of the good data and research that backs up 6+ months so you can broadcast that message to any doubters and see it as a strength to push things toward what’s right and fair for all (this report from Brigid Schulte and team at New America is loaded with compelling evidence).

2) Talk about your future at your employer—projects that are on the horizon for after your leave, your long-term career growth—so that people see, obviously, that you’re committed to staying.

3) Insist that your partner also take some leave. I know you’re thinking, but if I have six months do they even need leave? Yes. Because if they don’t have it, the gap between their non leave and your humane six months could set you up for uneven co-parenting for the long haul. By six months, trust me, you will be really good at the baby stuff, and if your partner isn’t as well, you risk becoming the default primary parent, which makes going back to work (or just arm wrestling over who’s staying home when the daycare floods) much, much harder.

Hamburger Cheese Bake

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INGREDIENTS

3 cup chopped green bell pepper
/4 cup sour cream
11 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1/3 cup chopped green onions
1 (16 ounce) package pasta
1 pound lean ground beef
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 (8 ounce) cans tomato sauce
1 teaspoon white sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 (8 ounce) container cottage cheese

In a large pot cook with boiling salted water cook pasta until its perfect for you. Meanwhile, prepare a large skillet over medium heat cook ground beef and chopped onions until brown. Stir in tomato sauce, sugar, salt, garlic, and pepper. Remove from heat. In a large bowl combine the cottage cheese, sour cream, softened cream cheese, green onion, and green bell pepper. To assemble, in a greased 11x7x1 1/2 inch baking dish spread half of the cooked and drained pasta. Top with half of the meat mixture. Cover with cheese mixture and remaining noodles and meat sauce. Sprinkle with grated Parmesan cheese. Bake in a preheat 350 degree F(175 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

ROSEMARY AND GARLIC LAMB SHOULDER

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Ingredients
1 x 2 kg lamb shoulder, bone in
1 bunch of fresh rosemary
1 bulb of garlic
2 teaspoons English mustard
olive oil
6 red onions
4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon plain flour
1 splash of red wine , optional
ROOT VEG MASH
400 g carrots
2 cloves of garlic
400 g floury potatoes
400 g parsnips
extra virgin olive oil

Remove the lamb shoulder from the fridge and allow to come up to room temperature. And reheat the oven at 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6. Pick most of the rosemary leaves into a pestle and mortar and bash with a pinch of sea salt. Peel and add 2 cloves of garlic and bash again. Muddle in the English mustard and 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  Slash the lamb all over with a sharp knife, season with black pepper, and then rub the rosemary mixture all over the lamb, making sure to get into all the nooks and crannies. Peel and thickly slice the onions, then place in a large deep roasting tray with the remaining rosemary and unpeeled garlic cloves. Drizzle with the balsamic vinegar and pour in 200ml of cold water. Place the lamb shoulder on top and roast for 20 minutes. Carefully remove the tray from the oven and cover tightly with a double layer of tin foil, then return to the oven, turn the heat down to 160ºC/315ºF/gas 2½, and cook for 4 hours, or until the meat pulls easily away from the bone. Remove the shoulder to a platter, cover loosely with the foil and leave to rest. Skim the fat from the tray, pick out and discard the rosemary, and squeeze the garlic cloves out of their skins. Place the tray on the hob over a medium heat, stir in the flour and cook for 2 minutes. Add 500ml of boiling water and the wine (if using), and stir well. Bring to the boil, and then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes, or until thick and glossy. To make the root veg mash, peel and roughly chop the carrots and peel 2 cloves of garlic. Place in a large pan of boiling salted water over a medium-high heat and cook for 5 minutes. Meanwhile peel and roughly chop the potatoes and parsnips, add them to the pan of boiling water with the carrots then cook for a further 15 minutes, or until tender.  Drain in a colander and leave to steam dry. Tip back into the pan, add a lug of extra virgin olive oil, then mash with a potato masher. Put some seasoning to taste. Shred up the lamb and serve up with the mash and onion gravy. Delicious served with steamed seasonal greens.

BARBECUE CHICKEN

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A very easy chicken recipe you can prepare for dinner and lunch. The dish can be ready to serve with 2hrs. This dish is best served with fried rice on it.

INGREDIENTS:

1 whole chicken, into halves
1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons barbeque sauce
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 cup barbeque sauce, or as needed

Cut 1/2-inch deep slashes in the skin-side of each chicken half; 2 cuts in each breast, 2 in the thigh, and 1 on the leg; remove wing tips. Whisk rice vinegar, barbeque sauce, and garlic together in large bowl. Place chicken in bowl and turn to coat chicken in the marinade. Arrange chicken halves, cut-side down, in the bottom of the marinade bowl, cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 1 hour. Preheat an outdoor grill for medium-high heat and lightly oil the grate. Remove chicken from bowl, pat chicken dry with paper towels, and discard marinade. Place chicken halves, skin-side up, on a plate and season with salt, pepper, paprika, onion powder, and cayenne pepper. Cook chicken, skin-side down, on the preheated grill for 3 to 4 minutes. Turn chicken over, close the lid of the grill, and cook, basting with remaining barbeque sauce ever 6 minutes, until no longer pink at the bone and the juices run clear, about 35 minutes. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, near the bone should read 165 degrees F (74 degrees C).

OKRA HEALTH BENEFITS

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Okra is a nutritional powerhouse used throughout history for both medicinal and culinary purposes. Once loved by the Egyptians and still used in many dishes today (such as the infamous gumbo dish), this pod-producing, tropical vegetable dates back over 3500 years ago. But still today, many are enjoying both okra health benefits and the vegetable’s edible delight. Okra is also referred to as lady’s finger and gumbo.

NUTRITIONAL CONTENTS
Fiber
 – 2.5 grams. 10% of RDA (recommended daily value)

Vitamin C –  16.3 milligrams. 27% RDA.

Folate – 46 micrograms. 11% RDA.

Vitamin A – 283 international units. 6% RDA.

Vitamin K – 40 micrograms. 50% RDA. The vitamin K found in okra is known as vitamin K1, one of two beneficial forms. The other beneficial form is K2; K3 is synthetic and should be avoided.

Niacin (Vitamin B3) – 0.9 mg. 4% RDA.

Thiamin (Vitamin B1) – 0.1 mg. 9% RDA.

Vitamin B6 – 0.2 mg. 9% RDA.

Magnesium – 36 mg. 9% RDA.

Manganese –  0.3 mg. 15% RDA.

Beta carotene – 225 mcg.

Lutein, Zeaxanthin – 516 mcg.

Okra Promotes a Healthy Pregnancy
An extremely important B vitamin for producing and maintaining new cells, folate is an essential compound for optimal pregnancy. The vitamin helps prevent birth defects like spina bifida and helps the baby to grow sufficiently. Vitamin C is also essential for fetal development. Okra is rich in both folate and vitamin C.

Prevent Diabetes
Thanks to fiber and other nutrients, okra prove beneficial in normalizing blood sugar in the body, helping with diabetes.

Prevents Kidney Disease
Researchers found that regular consumption of okra can help prevent kidney disease. In the study, “those who ate okra daily reduced clinical signs of kidney damage more than those that simply ate a diabetic diet.” This also ties in with diabetes, as nearly 50% of kidney disease cases are caused by diabetes.

Supports Colon Health
Okra is full of dietary fiber, which is essential for colon health and digestive health as a whole. The fiber Okra provides helps to clean out the gastrointestinal system, allowing the colon to work at greater levels of efficiency. Additionally, the vitamin A contributes to healthy mucous membranes, helping the digestive tract to operate appropriately.

Could Help with Respiratory Issues
Okra contain vitamin C, which has been shown to help with respiratory issues like asthma. The consumption of fruit rich in vitamin C, even at a low level of intake, may reduce wheezing symptoms in childhood, especially among already susceptible individuals.

Promotes Healthy Skin
Vitamin C helps keep the skin looking young and vibrant. The vitamin aids in the growth and repair of bodily tissues, which affects collagen formation and skin pigmentation, and helps to rejuvenate damaged skin. Okra is full of vitamin C. Topical tip: Boil a handful of okra until soft. After letting it cool, mash it, and apply it to your face. After 5 minutes, your skin should feel smooth and rejuvenated.